Author: thehomelyhours

The Third Sunday After Trinity

Collect: O Lord, we beseech thee mercifully to hear us; and grant that we, to whom thou hast given an hearty desire to pray, may, by thy mighty aid, be defended and comforted in all dangers and adversities; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. Saints Days Thursday, July 11 – St. Benedict of Nursia All we know about St. Benedict of Nursia is what St. Gregory the Great wrote about him in the second book of his dialogues. St. Benedict and his twin sister St. Scholastica were born around 480 in the city of Nursia in central Italy. The Roman Empire had collapsed in 476. When Benedict was sent to Rome to study when he was 14, he was so appalled by the immorality of his fellow students and the city itself that he secretly fled and joined a small community of scholars 30 miles away. He then became a hermit in Subiaco, where he began to attract followers. Eventually, after a few poisoning attempts from monks who had wanted him to be their abbot and …

The Second Sunday After Trinity

Collect: “O Lord, who never failest to help and govern those whom thou dost bring up in thy steadfast fear and love; Keep us, we beseech thee, under the protection of thy good providence, and make us to have a perpetual fear and love of thy holy Name; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.” Feast Day: Tuesday, July 2: The Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary On this day, we remember the event recorded in Luke 1:39-56, when the Virgin Mary hurries to see her cousin Elizabeth after the Annunciation. It’s also celebrated on May 31st. But, from 1263 (when St. Bonaventure proposed the new feast day for the Franciscans) to 1969, it was celebrated on July 2. As soon as Elizabeth sees Mary, she greets her with what became the basis for the Angelus : “Blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb!” John the Baptist leaps in his mother’s womb at Mary’s approach. And Mary responds with her song, the Magnificat, which we sing, remembering the Incarnation, at Evening Prayer. …

A Window into Helen’s Home

I’m excited to share with you this next submission to our Meaningful Home series. The series has been inspired by G.K. Chesterton’s advice “It is the main earthly business of a human being to make his home, and the immediate surroundings of his home, as symbolic and significant to his own imagination as he can.” Our friend Helen Moineau is an Anglican missionary in Croatia with her husband and two young children. She writes from the perspective of moving over a dozen times in the last six years. You can find her on Instagram (@helen.wildrose). There’s a battered cardboard box sitting in my closet, where multiple times a year I seem to find myself either packing or unpacking its contents: pieces of our family’s simple prayer corner and home altar. Our family has been in overseas ministry for several years now, and between raising support, traveling, living in multiple countries, plans falling through, and just honest and simple failure at times, we’ve had the odd circumstance of having moved over a dozen times in the past six …

The First Week After Trinity

Collect: O God, the strength of all those who put their trust in thee; Mercifully accept our prayers; and because, through the weakness of our mortal nature, we can do no good thing without thee, grant us the help of thy grace, that in keeping thy commandments we may please thee, both in will and deed; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen Saints and Blesseds Monday, June 24: The Nativity of John the Baptist We only celebrate the births of three people in the church year: Jesus, Mary, and John the Baptist. John the Baptist’s nativity was celebrated very early, to the point that it was an old feast day for Augustine in the 4th century.  We read about John’s birth in Luke 1. The angel Gabriel announces to Zechariah, a priest, that his barren wife Elizabeth will bear a son. When Zechariah questions the angel, he is struck speechless until Elizabeth gives birth and he declares his son’s name to be John. Scripture tells us nothing of John’s life between his birth and public ministry …

Trinity Sunday

Collect: Almighty and everlasting God, who hast given unto us thy servants grace, by the confession of a true faith, to acknowledge the glory of the eternal Trinity, and in the power of the Divine Majesty to worship the Unity; We beseech thee that thou wouldest keep us steadfast in this faith, and evermore defend us from all adversities, who livest and reignest, one God, world without end. Amen. Saints:  Monday, June 17, St. Barnabas the Apostle (transferred from June 11) In Acts 11:24, St. Luke describes Barnabas as “a good man, full of the Holy Spirit and of faith.” Though Barnabas is not named as one of the twelve apostles, he early emerged as a leader in the new Christian church. He was a Levite from from Cyprus, who sold his estate and gave the proceeds to the Church when He became a Christian (and it was when he was with St. Paul in Antioch that the name “Christian” first began to be used). He may have known Paul from studying with Gamaliel and …

Pentecost, Commonly Called Whitsunday

The Collect O God, who as at this time didst teach the hearts of thy faithful people, by sending to them the light of thy Holy Spirit; Grant us by the same Spirit to have a right judgement in all things, and evermore to rejoice in his holy comfort; through the merits of Christ Jesus our Saviour, who liveth and reigneth with thee, in the unity of the same Spirit, one God, world without end. Amen. Simple Traditions for Pentecost Here is a printable of a Litany of the Holy Ghost  to pray with your family today or during the octave. (I find that my young children do well with litanies; Since they can’t read yet, they like that they can follow along with the responses so easily). Before we go to church (in red clothes, of course), we’ll try to leave enough time to go out in the backyard and walk around in the dew with bare feet (a tradition that derived from the hymn verse in “Come, Thou Holy Spirit, Come” which says On our …

The Sunday after Ascension

Collect: O God, the King of glory, who hast exalted thine only Son Jesus Christ with great triumph into thy kingdom in heaven; We beseech thee, leave us not comfortless; but send to us thy Holy Ghost to comfort us, and exalt us unto the same place whither our Saviour Christ is gone before, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the same Holy Ghost, one God, world without end. Amen. Saints of the Week Monday, June 3: The Martyrs of Lyons (transferred from the 2nd) In 177, though much of the Church had relative peace, isolated pockets of intense persecution occurred, such as in Lyons. In Lyons, rumors began to circulate that Christians practiced cannibalism and incest (derived from misunderstanding of the Eucharist and the Kiss of Peace). The persecution started with social ostracizing, but grew into popular violence, and eventually, imprisonment and torture. Eventually, all the major members of both congregations in the city were imprisoned. Among these were Sanctus, a deacon, Maturus, a new Christian, Attalus, and Blandina, a slave. Sanctus had burning …

A Window into Libby’s Home

It’s been so exciting to receive your submissions to our Meaningful Home series. The series has been inspired by G.K. Chesterton’s advice “It is the main earthly business of a human being to make his home, and the immediate surroundings of his home, as symbolic and significant to his own imagination as he can.” Here is another great submission from Libby Ibanez, a homeschooling mom of 4 living liturgically in the heart of Texas. We are a large family of 6 with children ages 2, 6, 8, and 10. We recently moved from a 4 bedroom home in Corpus Christi, Texas to a 3 bedroom apartment in Austin, Texas. The downsizing was one of the hardest things I’ve had to do in a long time. One thing that mattered to us was a home altar/sacred space. But going from 2400sqft to 1300 was something we didn’t think we could make happen. But, with a bit of creativity (and Pinterest) we did it! I used a small bookshelf and put it in the corner of our apartment …

The Fifth Week after Easter (Rogation and Ascension)

Feast Days Sunday through Wednesday, May 26-29: Rogation Sunday & Rogation Days Collect for Rogation Sunday: O Lord, from whom all good things do come; Grant to us thy humble servants, that by thy holy inspiration we may think those things that are good, and by thy merciful guiding may perform the same; through our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. The word “Rogation” comes from the Latin “rogare” or “to ask.” The Rogation Days began in 470, after a series of natural disasters in Vienne, France. The Archbishop Mamertus called for a fast and said that the people were to process around their fields with litanies and prayers just as the crops were beginning to sprout. These processions took hold and became a custom. Gradually, the Rogation Days became a time of festival, celebrating the advent of spring. The members of a parish would process around the boundaries of the parish, which could take a whole day. You can learn more about the Rogation Days here. At our church, we will have a blessing of the …